27th November 2019

KYC vs AML

KYC vs AML – What Is The Difference?

Anti-money laundering (AML) regulations are mandated by both national and international authorities around the world and place a wide variety of screening and monitoring obligations on financial institutions. Those AML obligations include the Know Your Customer (KYC) process, however, given the proximity of the terms ‘AML’ and ‘KYC’ and the fact that they are often used interchangeably, it can be difficult to understand how they differ in a regulatory context. 

The importance of the compliance function means that firms must be familiar with the difference between AML and KYC and, similarly, understand how both relate to each other during the regulatory process.

What is the Difference Between AML and KYC?

KYC and Enhanced Due Diligence

KYC allows firms to take a risk-based approach to AML so they know who their customers are, and what level of money laundering risk they present.

In situations where a customer presents a particularly high risk of money laundering, the KYC process should involve Enhanced Due Diligence (EDD), which may involve:

  • Collecting additional customer identification materials
  • Verifying the source of customer funds
  • Scrutinizing the purpose of transactions or the nature of business relationships more closely
  • Implementing ongoing monitoring procedures 

KYC in an AML Solution

In most jurisdictions, AML regulations require firms to develop and implement an AML program that is tailored to their own business needs and is capable of managing the specific risks that their customers or sectors present.

A firm’s AML program should facilitate the practical screening and monitoring processes required by the AML legislation under which it operates. 

The regulatory requirements and screening processes associated with AML may change depending on prevalent trends in financial crime and the legislative needs of financial authorities.

The KYC process should take place during onboarding to ensure that customers are being truthful about who they are and the business in which they are involved. Verifying a customers’ identity is achieved by assessing the customers’ personal information, the nature of the customer’s business and establishing the beneficial ownership.

KYC should also take place throughout the business relationship to establish that a customer’s risk profile continues to match the firm’s information on them.

The relationship between AML programs and the KYC process should be one of continuous feedback. As a subset of AML, KYC can be used to tailor an AML program to a business’ unique needs, refining customer risk profiles and enhancing compliance performance.

Specialized KYC software is available to help firms manage the identity verification process, allowing them to automatically prioritize high-risk customers, while reducing human error and false positives.

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